Category Archives for Retirement Planning

Don’t Retire, REWIRE! with Jeri Sedlar

Retirement used to mean the end of work, a secure self- identity, a life of leisure and the inevitable onset of old age. Retirement expert, Jeri Sedlar will present a new retirement model – rewirement – and discuss the 5 step rewiring process from her highly acclaimed book, Don’t Retire, REWIRE! Working with pre- and post-retirees, Sedlar discovered the pain, pleasure, pitfalls, and possibilities associated with planning and living in retirement, plus the lifelines needed for continuous engagement throughout life.

In this program, you’ll discover:

  • How to identify your drivers or personal motivators and how they impact your future
  • The dynamics of creating a rewired life portfolio
  • The health benefits of rewiring

Date: Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 am Central, and 6 AM Hawaiian)

Cost: Free of charge

About Jeri Sedlar

Jeri Sedlar is an internationally recognized author, speaker, and lecturer on the topic of retirement. She is the co-author of the highly acclaimed book, DON’T RETIRE, REWIRE! 5 Steps To Fulfilling Work That Fuels Your Passion, Suits Your Personality and Fills Your Pocket and ON TARGET: Enhance Your Life and Ensure Your Success.

For more than 20 years, Jeri has been actively researching individuals and organizations on the pleasure, pain, and possibilities associated with an aging society. Her findings led to the creation of the five-step Rewiring© process, which focuses on finding new purpose, new passions, new play and new work possibilities that promote healthy, fun and fulfilling futures.

Her belief is that life planning done in conjunction with financial planning allows individuals to leverage their personal and professional assets to the fullest. She has emerged as one of the country’s leading thought – leaders on “the new way to do retirement,” or as she calls it rewirement©.

Jeri has served as Senior Advisor to The Conference Board on the Mature Workforce, and as a Judge for the AARP Best Employers Award for Workers 50+. She was a Delegate to the White House Conference on Aging and is currently on the AARP Executive Council of New York.

Her passion is the non-profit sector and its related challenges, and she serves on many boards. A graduate of Michigan State, she resides in New York City with her husband.

Click here to listen to the replay.

The Jolt Phenomenon with Mark Miller

Jolts can derail us — or they can propel us into reclaiming and remaking our lives. They prompt us to ask questions about our values and purpose. Psychologists have been studying this phenomenon for some time; one research team at the University of North Carolina Charlotte back in the mid-1990s named the phenomenon “post-traumatic growth” (PTG). Since then, PTG has emerged as an important field of study for psychologists and social scientists.

Jolt explores a range of PTG experiences – -the death of a child, life-threatening illness, plane crashes, terror attacks, natural disasters – and also a wide range of growth responses.

In this program, you will discover:

  • What is the process of change that trauma survivors experience as they grow?
  • What does the process of change look like from the inside for jolt survivors?
  • What is the role of spirituality and faith? Who is most likely to experience growth after trauma – and who is not?
  • And, what is the meaning of these stories of trauma and growth for the rest of us?

About Mark Miller

For more than a decade, Mark Miller has researched and written about what motivates people to reinvent their lives. He is a nationally recognized expert on retirement and aging; he writes a column for Reuters, and contributes to The New York Times and other national news outlets.

Mark is the author of Jolt: Stories of Trauma and Transformation, which tells the stories of people transformed by growth following trauma, and the new paths that they pursue.

Some are on missions to help others or to make things right in the world, while others embark on new careers. Some people simply find that their relationships grow deeper, or seek a stronger spiritual dimension in their lives.

The Reinvention of Retirement with Connie Zweig

Crossing the threshold into late life can feel like a high-wire act without a net. But, if you are retiring or rewiring, ill or caregiving, feeling purposeful or disoriented, yearning to serve or do spiritual practice, you can learn to cross over from denial to awareness, from distraction to presence, from role to soul.

How do we explore who we are beyond work? How do we uncover the unconscious material that erupts around losing our roles, losing our loved ones, losing control of our bodies, losing our faith? And how do we overcome the denial, resistance, and distraction that arises with these changes?

If you want to move past denial, fear, and resistance to discover your dreams and opportunities for this stage of life, join us to redefine “age” and to help you re-imagine and reinvent it for yourself.

In this program, you will discover:

  • Retirement as Rorshach Test
  • Hearing the call
  • Denying the call — What stops us from stopping?
  • Heeding the call — Who am I now?
  • Liminal space
  • Release of the Doer
  • Role of shadow-work
  • Role of spiritual work: meditation and ritual
  • Shift from hero to elder
  • Crossing the threshold from role to soul

About Connie Zweig

Connie Zweig recently retired after 30 years as a therapist. She is co-author of bestsellers, Meeting the Shadow and Romancing the Shadow, author of Meeting the Shadow of Spirituality and A Moth to the Flame: The Life Story of Rumi (a novel). She is a certified Sage-ing Leader and is currently writing The Reinvention of Age. She is blogging excerpts on Medium.

Listen to the replay here.

10 Ways to Have a Happy Retirement with Richard Eisenberg

Some people have a much better retirement experience than others. What makes the difference? Having a plan and figuring out what you want out of retirement in advance so that you have laid the groundwork for a retirement experience that works for you and your family. In this month’s program, Richard Eisenberg outlines the ten ways that you can achieve a happy retirement. He will be covering:

  • How to figure out in advance what you want out of retirement.
  • If you have a husband, wife or partner, talk frankly together about what you both want out of retirement.
  • Plan your transition into retirement.
  • Come up with a retirement income plan.
  • Choose when to retire and then follow through (if you can).
  • Stay engaged and healthy (if you can).
  • Get a part-time job in retirement.
  • Learn new things or pursue your passions.
  • Keep a schedule, but not like the one you had before you retired.
  • See your children and grandchildren, if you have any.

About Richard Eisenberg

Richard Eisenberg is Managing Editor of PBS’ Nextavenue.org, a site for people in their 50s and 60s. He is also the editor of the site’s Money and Work & Purpose channels and a frequent blogger there. Previously, he was Executive Editor of Money Magazine and Front Page Finance Editor for Yahoo! He is the author of two books: How to Avoid a Mid-Life Financial Crisis and The Money Book of Personal Finance.

You can listen to the replay at https://InstantTeleseminar.com/Events/112495161

You can download the list of resources Richard mentioned on the call here:

Time Together/Time Apart: Parallel Play in the Second Half of Life

In The Couple’s Retirement Puzzle we talk about Time Together and Time Apart as one of the “must-have” conversations for transitioning to the second half of life. It’s not unusual that partners have differing expectations.

For example, Mary, a woman who had primarily worked at home didn’t want her husband, Frank, around all of the time. In fact, she didn’t want him to retire from his work until he had a plan. She didn’t want him sitting around, being bored, maybe rearranging the kitchen cabinets, wanting her to cancel her plans so she would be around and basically being dependent on her for their social life.  A stereotype? Yes. Something that often happens? Yes.

Judy, in contrast, expected that her husband would want to do everything with her and she looked forward to it. He, however, wanted to pursue some other interests that she didn’t share.  Morris wanted to sell their home and move to Florida.  Ruthie, in contrast,  hated Florida and wanted to stay in the family home and live near the grandchildren.  Although never spending time apart, they finally reached a creative solution. He rented a condo in Florida during the winter months and she stayed in their family home. Result: they ended up enjoying their time apart and learning new things—and saw that their relationship improved when they were back together. Thomas, in preparation for retirement,  learned to play a new musical instrument and joined with other musicians for “gigs”  while his wife continued in her usual activities, getting together with her friends and volunteering. Creativity in how to spend time together and apart is crucial for couples, whether you’re married or not.

I recently read an article in the WSJ Article on September 9, 2013,  by Psychologist Maryanne Vandevere. From my perspective, she expanded on this notion of time together and time apart in an interesting way. She wrote about the role of parallel play in the life of retirees. She pointed out that, similar to small children, who play side by side and don’t always interact with the activity,  successful retirees have a similar process when each learns something new, follows their own passion and their partner also does their “own thing.” Each develops their own interests and it enhances their relationship since both are happy, enjoying their own creativity and mastery. This can bring new energy and excitement to the relationship.  It works for kids—why not give it a try in the second half of life?

Vandevere comments that “individuals who do almost everything together in later life—who are “joined at the hip” usually aren’t as satisfied or fulfilled as couples where spouses have their own interests and, ideally, are learning new skills. She points out that “the model of parallel play meets the needs “for both freedom and involvement.”

What are the benefits, you may be asking?  Vandevere suggests a few, such as more interesting dinner conversations, confidence for each that you can function independently and “tonic for the soul” to have some time and space for separateness and self-reflection. She also points out that challenging oneself can bring both mastery and pride and, as the old adage says, “absence (often) makes the heart grow fonder.” I like her image that “parallel play gives you ‘roots and wings’ and allows you to grow.” She further states that “It promotes the major task for this stage of life: becoming as whole as you can be. “

My suggestion: talk together about your expectations about time together and apart and creatively think about the notion of parallel play in your life and relationship. In the process, you can challenge and develop yourself and have more to bring back to your partner. I’d love to hear your thoughts and ideas on this.