Category Archives for Aging

Women Rowing North with Mary Pipher

Women growing older contend with ageism, misogyny, and loss. Yet as Mary Pipher shows, most older women are deeply happy and filled with gratitude for the gifts of life. Their struggles help them grow into the authentic, empathetic, and wise people they have always wanted to be.

In Women Rowing North, Pipher offers a timely examination of the cultural and developmental issues women face as they age. Drawing on her own experience as daughter, sister, mother, grandmother, caregiver, clinical psychologist, and cultural anthropologist, she explores ways women can cultivate resilient responses to the challenges they face. “If we can keep our wits about us, think clearly, and manage our emotions skillfully,” Pipher writes, “we will experience a joyous time of our lives. If we have planned carefully and packed properly, if we have good maps and guides, the journey can be transcendent.”

All the details of our upcoming call are below:

Date: Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 am Central, and 7 AM Hawaiian)

Topic: Women Rowing North

Speaker: Mary Pipher, Ph.D., speaker and author

About Mary Pipher

Mary Pipher graduated in Cultural Anthropology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1969 and received her Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska in Clinical Psychology in 1977. She has worked most of her life as a therapist, and she has taught at the University of Nebraska and Nebraska Wesleyan University. She was a Rockefeller Scholar in Residence at Bellagio and has received two American Psychological Association Presidential Citations, one of which she returned to protest psychologists’ involvement in enhanced interrogations at Guantanamo. She is the author of ten books including Reviving Ophelia and her latest, Women Rowing North. Four of her books have been New York Times bestsellers. She is a contributing writer for the New York Times.

To join the call: Please register at https://www.revolutionizeretirement.com/interviews/ 

Exploring Your Identity, Creativity, and Life Structure in Retirement with Teresa Amabile

Even if you are healthy and financially secure, you may struggle with the first months or years of retirement because of identity loss. How can you explore important aspects of your identity before fully retiring, to achieve a confident sense of self, post-retirement?

In this program, you’ll discover:

  • What creativity is, and what it isn’t
  • How thinking expansively about creativity, and injecting creativity into your work life and personal life, can enhance pre-retirement and post-retirement life satisfaction
  • The four developmental tasks of the retirement transition, and the different ways people move through them
  • How aspects of your life structure can shift in surprising ways, post-retirement, and how you can better prepare for those shifts

All the details of our upcoming call are below:

Date: Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 am Central, and 6 AM Hawaiian)

Topic: Exploring Your Identity, Creativity, and Life Structure in Retirement

Speaker: Dr. Teresa Amabile, Baker Foundation Professor, Harvard Business School is a researcher, teacher, and author

About Teresa Amabile

Teresa Amabile has researched and written about creativity for over 40 years. Beginning with a series of papers in the 1970s and 1980s, she was instrumental in establishing the social psychology of creativity – the study of how the social environment can influence creative behavior, primarily by influencing motivational state. Teresa’s research has examined individual creativity and productivity, team creativity, and organizational innovation. This program of research has yielded a comprehensive theory of creativity and innovation; methods for assessing creativity, motivation, and the work environment; and a set of prescriptions for maintaining and stimulating both individual creativity and organizational innovation. Her more recent research investigated how everyday life inside organizations can influence people and their performance by affecting inner work life, the confluence of motivation, emotion, and perceptions. She is currently studying retirement and post-employment life, including the impact of creative activities on attitudes toward aging and experiences in later life.

Teresa’s scholarly work has appeared in a variety of psychology and organizational behavior journals, as well as her 2011 book (with Steven Kramer), The Progress Principle: Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work. She has presented her work to audiences in a variety of settings, including Pixar, Genentech, TEDx Atlanta, Apple, and The World Economic Forum in Davos.

In 2018, Teresa received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy of Management, the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Israel Organizational Behavior Conference, and the Distinguished Scholar Award from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. In 2011 and 2013, she was named to the global Thinkers50 list.

Teresa holds a B.S. in Chemistry from Canisius College and a Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University.

To listen to the replay, visit https://instantteleseminar.com/Events/115787163.

The Paradox of Aging with John Leland

What can we all learn about living better from people who have lived long enough to know something about life? John Leland, an award-winning New York Times reporter, spent a year following six people over age 85, expecting to write about the hardships of growing old. Instead, he got a wealth of lessons that surprised him. In a culture that worships youth, older people are more content, less stressed, and better able to deal with loss than younger people. The good news about old age, as Leland wrote in his book Happiness is a Choice You Make: Lessons From a Year Among the Oldest Old, a New York Times bestseller, is that there is good news of old age.

The answer came from an unexpected place: from the lives of six people age 85 and up. He expected them to educate him in the hardships of old age. Instead, they taught him lessons of resilience, gratitude, purpose, and perspective that apply to people of any age. All had lost something – spouses, mobility, their keen eyesight or hearing. But none had lost everything. And they defined their lives by the things they could still do, not by what they had lost.

Sociologists call this the “paradox of aging.” As much as our culture obsesses over youth, older people are more content with their lives than young adults. They’re less stressed, less afraid of death, better able to manage whatever difficulties come their way – even when their lives are very, very hard. The good news about old age is that there is good news. And the better news is that we can all learn from our elders’ wisdom and experience. Whatever your age, it’s not too late to learn to think like an old person.

In this program, you’ll learn their strategies for cultivating:

  • resilience
  • gratitude
  • interdependence rather than independence
  • purpose
  • acceptance, including accepting mortality

All the details of our upcoming call are below:

Date: Tuesday, September 24, 2019
Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 am Central, and 6 AM Hawaiian)
Topic: The Paradox of Aging: Why People Are Happier as They Age
Speaker: John Leland, NY Times journalist and author

About John Leland The Paradox of Aging with John Leland

John Leland is a reporter at the New York Times, where he wrote a year-long series following six people age 85 and up, which became the basis for his new book, Happiness Is a Choice You Make: Lessons from a Year Among the Oldest Old,  a New York Times bestseller. Before joining the Times in 2000, he was a senior editor at Newsweek and editor-in-chief of Details magazine.

To listen to the replay, visit https://instantteleseminar.com/Events/115786974.

We’ll Get By With a Little Help From Our Friends with Joy Loverde

For those who have no support system in place, the thought of aging without help can be a frightening, isolating prospect. Whether you have friends and family ready and able to help you or not, growing old does not have to be an inevitable decline into helplessness. It is possible to maintain a good quality of life in your later years, but having a plan is essential. You’ll be empowered to make proactive plans for your own lives rather than entrusting decisions to family and community.

In this program, you’ll discover:

  • Advice on the tough medical, financial, and housing decisions to come
  • Real solutions to create a support network
  • Questions about aging solo readers don’t know to ask
  • Guidance on new products, services, technology, and resources

Date: Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 am Central, and 6 AM Hawaiian)

Cost: Free of charge

About Joy Loverde

Joy Loverde has a reputation for being a path carver and a visionary when it comes to active aging. She is the author of the best-seller, The Complete Eldercare Planner and Who Will Take Care of Me When I’m Old?

Joy is an expert media source, product spokesperson, keynote speaker, and mature-market consultant. She is frequently in the news… you may have seen her on the Today Show or read about her in the Wall Street Journal.

Today, Joy is looking forward to sharing strategies on cultivating trusting and long-lasting friendships as we anticipate the need to rely more on each other as we grow older.

Click here to listen to the replay.

Creating a Grassroots Force to Change Policy and Build Community with Bruce Frankel and Paul Nagle

Bruce Frankel and Paul E. Nagle will discuss the creation of Stonewall Village NYC, which aims to build a movement for LGBTQ-friendly housing and an intergenerational community to protect and care for NYC’s LGBTQ elders, who are among the city’s most lonely, impoverished, excluded and threatened citizens.

About Bruce Frankel and Paul Nagle

Bruce R. Frankel is a partner in Redstring, a community-building technology and business, and its chief content officer. He is also Co-President of The Life Planning Network and of LPN’s New England Chapter, and author of What Should I Do With The Rest Of My Life? as well as a co-editor of Live Smart After 50! The Experts Guide to Life For Uncertain Times. He is also a writer of World War II: History’s Greatest Conflict. Before turning his attention to issues of aging, he was a prize-winning journalist, the New York-based national reporter for USA Today and a senior writer and editor for People magazine. He earned his MFA in Poetry from Sarah Lawrence College at age 53.

Paul E. Nagle is the executive director of Stonewall Community Development Corporation, which seeks to partner with commercial developers to create affordable housing for LGBTQ elders. He is directing the creation of Stonewall Village NYC, a vibrant virtual village to support the elder LGBTQ population of New York with education-facilitation for LGBT housing opportunities, programs and services to support aging in place, health, and socialization to end isolation, and more. Paul was previously the executive director of Cultural Strategies Initiative in NYC, and director of communications and cultural policy for a member of the NYC Council. He has a background in international cultural policy, which he studied at NYU.

Listen to the replay at https://instantteleseminar.com/Events/108274098