Category Archives for Aging

What Retirees Want: A Holistic View of Life’s Third Age with Dr. Ken Dychtwald

Thanks to extraordinary medical, demographic, and economic shifts, most of us will live unprecedentedly long lives. Consequently, the world is witnessing a powerful new version of retirement—the Third Age—driven by the power and needs of the massive Baby Boomer generation. Consumers over 50 now account for more than half of all spending and control more than 70% of the country’s net worth.

How will work, family, health, leisure, money, success, purpose, and retirement be transformed in the years ahead to accommodate two billion people over the age of 60 worldwide?

In this program, you’ll discover how individuals and businesses can best prepare to thrive in a new era—where the needs and demands of third agers will set the lifestyle, health, social, marketplace, and political priorities of generations to come.

All the details of our upcoming call are below:

Date: Tuesday, July 28, 2020

Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 AM Central, and 6 AM Hawaiian)

Topic: What Retirees Want: A Holistic View of Life’s Third Age

Speaker: Ken Dychtwald, Ph.D., a pioneer in the aging field and a gerontologist, psychologist educator, lecturer, consultant, entrepreneur, and expert on aging-related issues

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About Ken Dychtwald

Over the past 40+ years, Dr. Ken Dychtwald has emerged as North America’s foremost visionary and original thinker regarding the lifestyle, marketing, health care, economic, and workforce implications of the age wave.

Ken is a psychologist, gerontologist, and best-selling author of 17 books on aging-related issues, including his latest book with Robert Morison, What Retirees Want: A Holistic View of Life’s Third Age. He was the executive producer and host of the highly-rated/acclaimed 2007 PBS documentary, The Boomer Century: 1946-2046, which aired over 2,000 times on PBS stations nationwide.

Since 1986, Ken has been the Founder and CEO of Age Wave, a firm created to guide companies and government groups in product/service development for boomers and mature adults. His client list has included over half the Fortune 500 companies. Ken has twice received the distinguished American Society on Aging Award for outstanding national leadership, and American Demographics honored him as the single most influential marketer to baby boomers over the past quarter-century. Ken and his wife, Maddy, recently received the Esalen Prize for their outstanding contributions to advancing the human potential of aging men and women worldwide. In 2018 he was awarded the Inspire Award from the International Council on Active Aging for his exceptional and lasting contributions to the active-aging industry and for his efforts to make a difference in the lives of older adults globally.

Catch the replay here.

The Making of a Modern Elder with Chip Conley

At age 52, after selling the company he founded and ran as CEO for 24 years, rebel boutique hotelier Chip Conley was looking at an open horizon in midlife. Then he received a call from the young founders of Airbnb, asking him to help grow their disruptive start-up into a global hospitality giant. He had the industry experience, but Conley was lacking in the digital fluency of his 20-something colleagues. He didn’t write code, or have an Uber or Lyft app on his phone, was twice the age of the average Airbnb employee, and would be reporting to a CEO young enough to be his son. Conley quickly discovered that while he’d been hired as a teacher and mentor, he was also in many ways a student and intern. What emerged is the secret to thriving as a mid-life worker: learning to marry wisdom and experience with curiosity, a beginner’s mind, and a willingness to evolve, all hallmarks of the “Modern Elder.”

In a world that venerates the new, bright, and shiny, many of us are left feeling invisible, undervalued, and threatened by the “digital natives” nipping at our heels. But Conley argues that experience is on the brink of a comeback. Because at a time when power is shifting younger, companies are finally waking up to the value of the humility, emotional intelligence, and wisdom that come with age. And while digital skills might have only the shelf life of the latest fad or gadget, the human skills that mid-career workers possess–like good judgment, specialized knowledge, and the ability to collaborate and coach – never expire.

Conley ignites an urgent conversation about ageism in the workplace, calling on us to treat age as we would other type of diversity. In the process, Conley liberates the term “elder” from the stigma of “elderly,” and inspires us to embrace wisdom as a path to growing whole, not old. Whether you’ve been forced to make a mid-career change, are choosing to work past retirement age, or are struggling to keep up with the millennials rising up the ranks, Wisdom@Work will help you write your next chapter.

All the details of our upcoming call are below:

Date: Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 am Central, and 6 AM Hawaiian)

Topic: The Making of a Modern Elder

Speaker: Chip Conley, author, speaker, and entrepreneur, and founder of the Modern Elder Academy

About Chip Conley

Chip Conley is a New York Times bestselling author and the hospitality maverick who helped Airbnb’s founders turn their fast-growing tech start-up into a global hospitality brand. In Wisdom@Work: The Making of a Modern Elder, he shares his unexpected journey at midlife – from CEO to intern – learning about technology as Airbnb’s Head of Global Hospitality and Strategy, while also mentoring CEO Brian Chesky. Chip is the founder of the Modern Elder Academy, where a new roadmap for midlife is offered at a beautiful oceanfront campus in Baja California Sur, Mexico. He serves on the board of Encore.org and the advisory board for the Stanford Center for Longevity.

To listen to the replay, click here.

Aging in Community: New (and Old) Ways of Living Well Together with Raines Cohen

The stereotypical modern ideal of independent solo living and aging is really a new modern experiment that doesn’t work well for many people. We can achieve greater independence through interdependence, if we’re willing to engage with neighbors or housemates to take care of one another. That’s what aging in community is all about.

There are lots of structures and ways that help people preserve their privacy while they share, such as setting clear limits and building relationships over time. Having a deeper shared purpose or value can support deeper relationships and caring, more than just housemates or places to live. You can get more of what you want or need in a community living arrangement by starting with a clear list of your own priorities, but instead of treating it as a list of demands, use it as a guide to your listening, and then prioritize.

All the details of our upcoming call are below:

Date: Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 am Central, and 7 AM Hawaiian)

Topic: Aging in Community: New (and Old) Ways of Living Well Together

Speaker: Raines Cohen, community organizer and CoHousing Coach

About Raines Cohen

Raines Cohen, CSA, CLIPP, is a community organizer pioneering the field of Aging in Community. As a Cohousing Coach, he works to help people find and co-create sustainable communities, cohousing neighborhoods, EcoVillages and all forms of cooperative shared living that blend privacy and community. He has visited over 125 North American cohousing neighborhoods and lived in two, and serves as a Global Ecovillage Network (GEN) Ambassador. As a Certified Senior Advisor (CSA), he loves to connect life planners and folks serving elders with new options for their clients. As a Certified Living in Place Professional (CLIPP), he looks for ways to help folks feel safer and more secure in their existing homes, as they age and evolve to incorporate new neighbors and housemates.

He wrote the Aging in Community chapter in the book Audacious Aging, was a founding member of Elders Action Network (EAN), and serves on the boards of Sage-ing International and Gray Panthers of the Berkeley/East Bay Area. He lives with his wife Betsy Morris at Berkeley (California) Cohousing.

Listen to the replay here.

Women Rowing North with Mary Pipher

Women growing older contend with ageism, misogyny, and loss. Yet as Mary Pipher shows, most older women are deeply happy and filled with gratitude for the gifts of life. Their struggles help them grow into the authentic, empathetic, and wise people they have always wanted to be.

In Women Rowing North, Pipher offers a timely examination of the cultural and developmental issues women face as they age. Drawing on her own experience as daughter, sister, mother, grandmother, caregiver, clinical psychologist, and cultural anthropologist, she explores ways women can cultivate resilient responses to the challenges they face. “If we can keep our wits about us, think clearly, and manage our emotions skillfully,” Pipher writes, “we will experience a joyous time of our lives. If we have planned carefully and packed properly, if we have good maps and guides, the journey can be transcendent.”

All the details of our upcoming call are below:

Date: Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 am Central, and 7 AM Hawaiian)

Topic: Women Rowing North

Speaker: Mary Pipher, Ph.D., speaker and author

About Mary Pipher

Mary Pipher graduated in Cultural Anthropology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1969 and received her Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska in Clinical Psychology in 1977. She has worked most of her life as a therapist, and she has taught at the University of Nebraska and Nebraska Wesleyan University. She was a Rockefeller Scholar in Residence at Bellagio and has received two American Psychological Association Presidential Citations, one of which she returned to protest psychologists’ involvement in enhanced interrogations at Guantanamo. She is the author of ten books including Reviving Ophelia and her latest, Women Rowing North. Four of her books have been New York Times bestsellers. She is a contributing writer for the New York Times.

To join the call: Please register at https://www.revolutionizeretirement.com/interviews/ 

Exploring Your Identity, Creativity, and Life Structure in Retirement with Teresa Amabile

Even if you are healthy and financially secure, you may struggle with the first months or years of retirement because of identity loss. How can you explore important aspects of your identity before fully retiring, to achieve a confident sense of self, post-retirement?

In this program, you’ll discover:

  • What creativity is, and what it isn’t
  • How thinking expansively about creativity, and injecting creativity into your work life and personal life, can enhance pre-retirement and post-retirement life satisfaction
  • The four developmental tasks of the retirement transition, and the different ways people move through them
  • How aspects of your life structure can shift in surprising ways, post-retirement, and how you can better prepare for those shifts

All the details of our upcoming call are below:

Date: Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 am Central, and 6 AM Hawaiian)

Topic: Exploring Your Identity, Creativity, and Life Structure in Retirement

Speaker: Dr. Teresa Amabile, Baker Foundation Professor, Harvard Business School is a researcher, teacher, and author

About Teresa Amabile

Teresa Amabile has researched and written about creativity for over 40 years. Beginning with a series of papers in the 1970s and 1980s, she was instrumental in establishing the social psychology of creativity – the study of how the social environment can influence creative behavior, primarily by influencing motivational state. Teresa’s research has examined individual creativity and productivity, team creativity, and organizational innovation. This program of research has yielded a comprehensive theory of creativity and innovation; methods for assessing creativity, motivation, and the work environment; and a set of prescriptions for maintaining and stimulating both individual creativity and organizational innovation. Her more recent research investigated how everyday life inside organizations can influence people and their performance by affecting inner work life, the confluence of motivation, emotion, and perceptions. She is currently studying retirement and post-employment life, including the impact of creative activities on attitudes toward aging and experiences in later life.

Teresa’s scholarly work has appeared in a variety of psychology and organizational behavior journals, as well as her 2011 book (with Steven Kramer), The Progress Principle: Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work. She has presented her work to audiences in a variety of settings, including Pixar, Genentech, TEDx Atlanta, Apple, and The World Economic Forum in Davos.

In 2018, Teresa received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy of Management, the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Israel Organizational Behavior Conference, and the Distinguished Scholar Award from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. In 2011 and 2013, she was named to the global Thinkers50 list.

Teresa holds a B.S. in Chemistry from Canisius College and a Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University.

To listen to the replay, visit https://instantteleseminar.com/Events/115787163.