Exploring Your Identity, Creativity, and Life Structure in Retirement with Teresa Amabile

Even if you are healthy and financially secure, you may struggle with the first months or years of retirement because of identity loss. How can you explore important aspects of your identity before fully retiring, to achieve a confident sense of self, post-retirement?

In this program, you’ll discover:

  • What creativity is, and what it isn’t
  • How thinking expansively about creativity, and injecting creativity into your work life and personal life, can enhance pre-retirement and post-retirement life satisfaction
  • The four developmental tasks of the retirement transition, and the different ways people move through them
  • How aspects of your life structure can shift in surprising ways, post-retirement, and how you can better prepare for those shifts

All the details of our upcoming call are below:

Date: Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 am Central, and 6 AM Hawaiian)

Topic: Exploring Your Identity, Creativity, and Life Structure in Retirement

Speaker: Dr. Teresa Amabile, Baker Foundation Professor, Harvard Business School is a researcher, teacher, and author

About Teresa Amabile

Teresa Amabile has researched and written about creativity for over 40 years. Beginning with a series of papers in the 1970s and 1980s, she was instrumental in establishing the social psychology of creativity – the study of how the social environment can influence creative behavior, primarily by influencing motivational state. Teresa’s research has examined individual creativity and productivity, team creativity, and organizational innovation. This program of research has yielded a comprehensive theory of creativity and innovation; methods for assessing creativity, motivation, and the work environment; and a set of prescriptions for maintaining and stimulating both individual creativity and organizational innovation. Her more recent research investigated how everyday life inside organizations can influence people and their performance by affecting inner work life, the confluence of motivation, emotion, and perceptions. She is currently studying retirement and post-employment life, including the impact of creative activities on attitudes toward aging and experiences in later life.

Teresa’s scholarly work has appeared in a variety of psychology and organizational behavior journals, as well as her 2011 book (with Steven Kramer), The Progress Principle: Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work. She has presented her work to audiences in a variety of settings, including Pixar, Genentech, TEDx Atlanta, Apple, and The World Economic Forum in Davos.

In 2018, Teresa received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy of Management, the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Israel Organizational Behavior Conference, and the Distinguished Scholar Award from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. In 2011 and 2013, she was named to the global Thinkers50 list.

Teresa holds a B.S. in Chemistry from Canisius College and a Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University.

To listen to the replay, visit https://instantteleseminar.com/Events/115787163.

The Paradox of Aging with John Leland

What can we all learn about living better from people who have lived long enough to know something about life? John Leland, an award-winning New York Times reporter, spent a year following six people over age 85, expecting to write about the hardships of growing old. Instead, he got a wealth of lessons that surprised him. In a culture that worships youth, older people are more content, less stressed, and better able to deal with loss than younger people. The good news about old age, as Leland wrote in his book Happiness is a Choice You Make: Lessons From a Year Among the Oldest Old, a New York Times bestseller, is that there is good news of old age.

The answer came from an unexpected place: from the lives of six people age 85 and up. He expected them to educate him in the hardships of old age. Instead, they taught him lessons of resilience, gratitude, purpose, and perspective that apply to people of any age. All had lost something – spouses, mobility, their keen eyesight or hearing. But none had lost everything. And they defined their lives by the things they could still do, not by what they had lost.

Sociologists call this the “paradox of aging.” As much as our culture obsesses over youth, older people are more content with their lives than young adults. They’re less stressed, less afraid of death, better able to manage whatever difficulties come their way – even when their lives are very, very hard. The good news about old age is that there is good news. And the better news is that we can all learn from our elders’ wisdom and experience. Whatever your age, it’s not too late to learn to think like an old person.

In this program, you’ll learn their strategies for cultivating:

  • resilience
  • gratitude
  • interdependence rather than independence
  • purpose
  • acceptance, including accepting mortality

All the details of our upcoming call are below:

Date: Tuesday, September 24, 2019
Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 am Central, and 6 AM Hawaiian)
Topic: The Paradox of Aging: Why People Are Happier as They Age
Speaker: John Leland, NY Times journalist and author

About John Leland The Paradox of Aging with John Leland

John Leland is a reporter at the New York Times, where he wrote a year-long series following six people age 85 and up, which became the basis for his new book, Happiness Is a Choice You Make: Lessons from a Year Among the Oldest Old,  a New York Times bestseller. Before joining the Times in 2000, he was a senior editor at Newsweek and editor-in-chief of Details magazine.

To listen to the replay, visit https://instantteleseminar.com/Events/115786974.

Hacking Longevity with Lori Bitter

Based on foundational research in 2018 with the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers and Gen X, Lori Bitter wanted to understand if people are embracing the idea of a 100-year life and if they are, what they are doing to get there. It was a massive project – focus groups, national survey of 3000+ respondents, and personal interviews on new research platform. In her research, she uncovered key motivational differences between the generations.

She just launched her 2019 study looking at five key shifts that emerged from the 2018 work, and she will be sharing these in this month’s program:

  • Caregiving
  • Grandparenting
  • Aging Single
  • Career Encoring
  • Change of Living Situation

All the details of our upcoming call are below:

Date: Tuesday, August 27, 2019
Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 am Central, and 6 AM Hawaiian)
Topic: Hacking Longevity: How 3 Generations Over 50 are Thinking About a 100-Year Life
Speaker: Lori K. Bitter, a seasoned trend analyst in the field of aging who provides strategic consulting, research and development for companies seeking to engage with mature consumers

About Lori Bitter

Lori K. Bitter provides strategic consulting, research and development for companies seeking to engage with mature consumers at The Business of Aging. Her recent research, Hacking Longevity, sponsored by AARP and Proctor & Gamble, has just launched its second study on key life shifts in later life. Lori was named a Next Avenue Influencer in Aging. Her book, The Grandparent Economy, is a National Mature Media Award winner. She serves as co-producer of What’s Next Boomer Business Summit and The Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit. Lori has more than 30 years of advertising, public relations and strategic planning experience. She serves on the advisory board of several start-ups and nonprofits.

A sought-after speaker, Lori has presented research, trends and analysis about mature consumers and the opportunity of the longevity marketplace to more than 200 conferences and events in the United States, the United Kingdom and Europe. She has been featured in Forbes and Entrepreneur’s 100 to Watch and appeared on CNBC.

Purpose and a Paycheck with Chris Farrell

Purpose and a Paycheck is the title of Chris Farrell’s latest book (published earlier this year by HarperCollins Leadership). The book focuses on entrepreneurship, innovation and work in the second half of life. Growing numbers of experienced adults are starting their own business and working well into the traditional retirement years. An impressive body of scholarly research strongly suggests that given the opportunity, people in the second half of life can be as creative, innovative, and entrepreneurial as their younger peers, if not more so.

Tapping into the talents of experienced workers and breaking down the barriers of age discrimination holds the promise of boosting the economy’s dynamism and household incomes.

In this program, you’ll discover:

  • The impact on the economy if more people continue working rather than retire
  • Why more people are working well into the traditional retirement years
  • The kind of jobs people are getting in their 60s and 70s
  • How to find a job in the second half of life

All the details of our upcoming call are below:

Date: Tuesday, July 23, 2019
Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 am Central, and 6 AM Hawaiian)
Topic: Purpose and a Paycheck
Speaker: Chris Farrell, author, senior economics contributor for Marketplace and columnist for PBS Next Avenue and Star Tribune

About Chris Farrell

Chris Farrell is senior economics contributor at Marketplace, American Public Media’s nationally syndicated public radio business and economic programs. He is economics commentator for Minnesota Public Radio and host of its series, Conversations on the Creative Economy. An award-winning journalist, Chris is a columnist for Next Avenue and the Star Tribune. He has written for Bloomberg Businessweek, New York Times, Kiplinger’s and other publications. His most recent book is Purpose and a Paycheck (HarperCollins Leadership).

Never Too Old To Get Rich with Kerry Hannon

Studies have shown that the highest success rates in entrepreneurship come from founders in middle age and beyond. It’s a global movement. Says Paul Irving, chairman of the Milken Institute’s Center for the Future of Aging: “We are just beginning to see the economic power of older adults– and the wisdom and experience that they bring to the workforce as entrepreneurs.”

Kerry Hannon provides action steps, insights, and resources from her new book, Never Too Old to Get Rich: Starting a Business at Mid-Life. She will discuss the rewards and challenges for those starting businesses from their passion and hobbies to senior-junior partnerships to start-ups by social entrepreneurs and women-led ventures.

In this program, you’ll discover:

  • What factors motivate someone to start a business mid-life
  • How someone prepares to launch his or her own business
  • Risks of starting a business in retirement
  • Joys of being an older entrepreneur
  • 8 tips on how to become a successful entrepreneur in midlife

All the details of our upcoming call are below:

Date: Tuesday, June 25, 2019
Time: 12:00 noon Eastern (9:00 am Pacific, 10 AM Mountain, 11 am Central, and 6 AM Hawaiian)
Topic:  Never Too Old To Get Rich
Speaker:  Kerry Hannon, nationally recognized expert and strategist on career transitions, personal finances, and retirement

About Kerry Hannon

Kerry Hannon is a leading authority and strategist on career transitions, entrepreneurship, personal finance, and retirement. She is a frequent TV and radio commentator and is a sought-after keynote speaker at conferences. Kerry is the best-selling and award-winning author of 13 books, including her latest book, Never Too Old to Get Rich: The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Starting a Business Mid-Life.

She has spent three decades covering all aspects of careers, business, and personal finance as a columnist, editor, and writer for the nation’s leading media companies. She is currently a columnist and regular contributor to The New York Times, AARP’s Work and Jobs Expert and Great Jobs columnist, contributing editor and Second Verse columnist at Forbes, and the PBS website NextAvenue.org expert and columnist on entrepreneurship, personal finance, wealth management and careers for boomer women.

Kerry is a National Press Foundation Fellow, a Fellow of the Columbia Journalism School and the Robert N. Butler Columbia Aging Center’s Age Boom Academy. She is a former Metlife Foundation and New America Media Fellow on Aging. She has testified before Congress about the importance of older workers.

Kerry received a bachelor’s degree from Duke University, where she is currently a member of an editorial board. Kerry lives in Washington, D.C., with her husband, documentary producer and editor Cliff Hackel, and her Labrador Retriever, Zena.

For the replay of this call, click here.

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